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Six Ways to Deal with Body Insecurities

by 9jababa

Body insecurity is a big issue for both genders. The insecurity can range from our thighs to our belly, any part of our body at all. When the insecurity wave hits, we find it hard to go about our daily lives happily. We feel different from others and sometimes we end up immersing ourselves in negative thoughts. These thoughts can cause us serious mental breakdowns, especially when it happens frequently. If you have ever felt the need to hide a part of your body, for fear of not being society’s preference. Or, you find it irritating to look in the mirror because you are scared of your appearance, this post is for you. We have listed six ways to deal with body insecurity.

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  1. Practice Positive self-talk. Naturally, we are our own greatest critics. We know ourselves best, hence, it’s not difficult to criticize our body the way we do. The initial step to defeat body insecurity is to block out the internal voice advising you to criticize yourself. More often than not, we’re not mindful of our negative self-talk and we let our harmful words bamboozle us. Start by exchanging phrases like “I look fat,” for “My body is amazing.” At first, it may feel weird, yet in the long run, you will feel the difference and begin rehearsing positive self-talk constantly.
  2. Don’t be scared of being vulnerable. To conquer your body insecurity, you should be honest with yourself first. Be vulnerable enough to understand that your negative self-talk is keeping you down and that maybe you need proficient assistance to go on the right path. There are so many others out there who identify with you and may likewise be wishing that they had somebody who could comprehend their insecurity issues and not judge what they are going through. Vulnerability isn’t a shortcoming. It is a strength.
  3. Be More Mindful. Body insecurities are often the result of a drive towards perfection. Nobody is perfect. Investing the work to turn into a more mindful individual will help battle the quest for perfection and assist you with dealing with your insecurities. Remember, there is no such thing as a perfect body. Your worth isn’t measured in pounds.
  4. Let go of the Scale. We would all be able to concur that weight gain or weight loss are some of the major causes of insecurity. Society has moulded us to accept the numbers on the scale matter more than our well-being. It is my duty to tell you otherwise. Discard your scale and focus on what makes a difference the most — your wellbeing.
  5. Don’t believe everything on social media. We’re stuck to our phones practically the entire day. Social media is our better approach for keeping in contact with what’s going on in the world. Notwithstanding, at times social media depict a template for a perfect body that isn’t perfect. We know superstars use filters to change how their bodies look, disposing of stretch marks, skin inflammation, and some other “imperfection” they have. Fortunately, social media applications like Instagram are beginning to boycott these channels that advance a phony rendition of oneself. In any case, it falls on you and me to alter our social media feeds to secure our emotional wellness.
  6. Reexamine your focus. There’s no question that society influences how we see ourselves, however, it’s time we assume responsibility for our bodies and mental self-portrait. Rather than zeroing in on what we look like in the mirror, how about we begin zeroing in on how we feel inside. Having a steady self-care schedule that focuses on our physical and mental wellbeing is vital to conquering body insecurities. Shift your focus towards those areas of progress.

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Remember that your body is not a battleground, your value offering is not measured in pounds. There’s no such thing as perfect. Your imperfections make you unique. You should never allow anyone shrink you.

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